From last year’s Storm Eunice to 1990’s Storm Daria, many of us will remember some of the worst storms to have hit the UK in recent history.

Now, the Met Office has revealed the names of the storms set to batter Britain in the upcoming season, which runs from September 2023 through to the end of August 2024.

Agnes, Ciaran, and Elin are among the new names chosen to honour those who work to keep people safe in times of extreme weather.

Meanwhile, Minnie has made the list in honour of the famous Beano character, Minnie the Minx. 

So, do you share a name with any of the upcoming storms? Scroll down to see the full list of the storms set to batter Britain. 

From last year's Storm Eunice (pictured) to 1990's Storm Daria, many of us will remember some of the worst storms to have hit the UK in recent history

From last year’s Storm Eunice (pictured) to 1990’s Storm Daria, many of us will remember some of the worst storms to have hit the UK in recent history

The Met Office has revealed the names of the storms set to batter Britain in the upcoming season, which runs from September 2023 through to the end of August 2024

The Met Office has revealed the names of the storms set to batter Britain in the upcoming season, which runs from September 2023 through to the end of August 2024

2023/2024 storm name list in full 

  • Agnes
  • Babet
  • Ciarán
  • Debi
  • Elin
  • Fergus
  • Gerrit
  • Henk
  • Isha
  • Jocelyn
  • Kathleen
  • Lilian
  • Minnie
  • Nicholas
  • Olga
  • Piet
  • Regina
  • Stuart
  • Tamiko
  • Vincent
  • Walid

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Storms are named by the Met Office when they’re deemed to have the potential to cause ‘medium’ or ‘high’ impacts in the UK, Ireland, or the Netherlands.

Wind is the main consideration for naming a storm, although rain and snow are also taken into account, according to the Met Office.

‘This is the ninth year of us naming storms and we do it because it works,’ Mr Lang said.

‘Naming storms helps to ease communication of severe weather and provides clarity when people could be impacted by the weather.’

Storms are named alphabetically – but don’t expect to see any names beginning with Q, U, X, Y or Z.

‘To ensure we are in line with the US National Hurricane Centre naming conventions, we are not going to include names which begin with the letters Q, U, X, Y and Z,’ the Met Office explains on its website.

‘This will maintain consistency for official storm naming in the North Atlantic.’

Usually, the list is made up of alternating male and female names.

But the Met Office has broken tradition this year, to enable the inclusion of some of the more popular submitted names.

Agnes will be the first storm to strike Britain this season, followed by Babet.

The third storm – Storm Ciarán – was submitted by the public, but is also the name of Ciarán Fearon, who works for the Department for Infrastructure in Northern Ireland.

‘With the effects of climate change, we are more aware than ever of how weather can affect us all in every aspect of our daily lives,’ Mr Fearon said.

Beano fans will be pleased to learn that Storm Minnie is also included on the list, following in the footsteps of Storm Dennis, which was named after Dennis the Menace in 2020

Beano fans will be pleased to learn that Storm Minnie is also included on the list, following in the footsteps of Storm Dennis, which was named after Dennis the Menace in 2020

‘In my role with the Department for Infrastructure I work closely with local communities in Northern Ireland and multi-agency partners to help keep everyone as warned and informed as possible.

‘We need to respect each weather event and this work, particularly during periods of severe weather and storms, helps to ensure that we are all as well prepared as possible to help reduce the impact of such events.’

Beano fans will be pleased to learn that Storm Minnie is also included on the list, following in the footsteps of Storm Dennis, which was named after Dennis the Menace in 2020.

If your name isn’t on the list, you’ll be happy to hear that you can submit it for consideration for next year’s list. 

‘Everyone is also welcome to suggest names for future consideration via email to [email protected],’ the Met Office added. 

READ MORE: Met Office should name heatwaves in the same way as storms to better alert people to dangers, scientists claim 

Scientists have claimed that the UK should name heatwaves in the same way as storms, as part of an effective early warning system to protect the most vulnerable.

Professor Mike Tipton from The Physiological Society said: ‘As part of raising awareness of the threat from heatwaves in the UK, heatwaves should be named in the same was as we name storms.

‘It makes the risk to health clear and that people can’t expect to continue as normal during the heatwave.’

Scientists have claimed that the UK should name heatwaves in the same way as storms

Scientists have claimed that the UK should name heatwaves in the same way as storms 

This post first appeared on Dailymail.co.uk

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